TU Dresden - Tropical Forestry Blog

Student research on production efficiency of small-scale tree growers in Tanzania

First field visit and interaction with farmers during WoodCluster field school in the selected study village. (©N. Mathayo)

I am Neema Mathayo, from Tanzania, Masters Student at Sokoine University of Agriculture doing MSc. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. I did my master thesis research on “Production efficiency of small-scale tree growers in Mufindi district, Iringa-Tanzania”. This research was done under WoodCluster project sponsored by German government.

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Timber value chain analysis – Field research in central Vietnam

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Visiting Acacia hybrid area in Phuloc district, Thua Thien Hue Province (Prof. Pretzsch, myself, and two members of Forest Sustainable Cooperative) (©Tham)

Hi. My name is La Thi Tham, a Phd student from Vietnam. My research is about the value chains of Acacia hybrid timber in Thua Thien Hue province, central Vietnam. Particularly, I’m going to compare the value chains of woodchip and furniture made of Acacia hybrid timber and explore the potential impacts of these chains on rural livelihood. I have conducted two phases of data collection which were between March-July 2018 and June-November 2019 in Vietnam. Read More

Award and MoU for German-Vietnamese-Cooperation

Prof. Pretzsch receives his award by the VNUF president (©VNUF)

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Pretsch, Tropical Forestry Chairholder, has been awarded by the Vietnam National University of Forestry (VNUF) for his continuous committment and contribution to the capacity building of the VNUF’s staff and teaching programs. During his visit, Prof. Pretzsch, on behalf of the Tropical Forestry Chair, and the VNUF additionally signed a Memorandum of Understanding. It states the cooperation on the universities’s training programs and exchange of lecturers and students; scientific research and a number of project activities related to the field of forestry. The  VNUF and the Chair of Tropical  Forestry of TUD have a long partnership over the last 30 years in teaching, research and alumni cooperation.

Visit of allotment gardens in Dresden – an excursion report

Exploring the allotment gardens and getting in contact with the gardners (©E. Auch)

I am Pooja Debnath from Bangladesh. I am a student of Tropical Forestry at the TU Dresden. Before coming to Dresden, I heard that Dresden is a city of natural beauty and the people of this city gives priority to conserve their nature and biodiversity. After arriving there, I found that the city is much more beautiful than I have imagined. In every house, there is a beautiful garden, which is impressive. Read More

Small-scale wood enterprises: MSc field work in Ethiopia

My name is Alexander Koch and I am a Master of Science student at the Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences. Here I study “Biological Resources”, which is a program that aims at studying the sustainable development of the Bio-Economy. Since my Bachelor studies in Resource Management, I have been convinced that solutions are most sustainable when considering them in a holistic manner and life cycle and value chain methods are good ways to do this. When I was given the opportunity to study the wood value chain in Ethiopia for my master thesis, I didn’t hesitate to take that opportunity.

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Interviewing a Eucalyptus pole trader during the WoodCluster Field School (©WoodCluster)

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Forestry cooperatives for smallholders – Field research experience in Ethiopia

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Field work (©Hintz)

Selam!” (‘hello’ in Amharic). I am Kendisha, a PhD student from Indonesia and a research assistant of the WoodCluster project. After participating at the WoodCluster Field School end of July, I remained in Hawassa, southern Ethiopia, to carry out the first phase of my data collection until October. My research is about the potential role of forestry cooperatives in linking smallholder tree farmers to a more structured market in Ethiopia. Despite being there during the height of the rainy season, it was in the end chigir yellem (‘no problem’ in Amharic). Read More